Collaborata
COLLABORATA BLOG

For someone who has spent the last three decades studying and advocating for youth, I’ve been a real fish out of water lately, immersed in learning about the aging population, often referred to as the “Longevity Economy.” And, as someone who for several years now has spent a special part of each day visiting his parents and other residents at a memory-care home, I’ve been personally invested (like so many Boomers) in the quality of my parents’ end of life. So, with that as personal grounding, I’ve embraced my newfound role as a student of this lifestage. And, I can’t help but imagine how it can and should change for my generation and those that follow.

One of the most exciting parts about working at Collaborata is whom I get to meet -- experts in areas way outside of my “youth comfort zone.” Lori Bitter is at the top of the list. I’ve been privileged over the past few months by the truly mind-expanding experience of...


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Based on a wide-ranging quantitative study from “Generation Nation” and other research, here are a few Millennial stereotypes that we’re okay perpetuating, because, well, they’re true.

 

1. Millennials are full of self-esteem and optimism

You better believe they are. Members of the generation that grew up with participation trophies think that they’re pretty great as young adults.

Millennials, much more than other generation, feel that their lives are “full of purpose,” which reflects their perceived self-worth. Fully 67% of Millennials believe this to be true, compared to only 53% of Gen Z, 55% of Xers, and 58% of Boomers.

Additionally, a higher percentage of Millennials than any other cohorts believe that their life will get better as they age. This optimistic streak is one of Millennials’ most enduring and unifying qualities. Although they’re optimistic about the direction of their lives, they also admit...


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According to the focus-group participants of “Hacking Longevity,” a new landmark study on aging, many seniors and Boomers are concerned about needing a caregiver, placing the “caregiving burden” on others, or the need to downsize and move out of their home.

Those who might receive care in the future did not want to be a burden on their children but yet did not have a plan to cover such a need. And while most seniors acknowledge that their housing situation is a challenge in terms of when, how and where to downsize, one common theme among all generations agreed that they did not want to cohabitate but instead value their own space.

We’ve seen in research from a previous Collaborata study, “Generation Nation,” that most Americans struggle to properly plan for their long-term future. Only 24% of Generation X, most of whom are in their 40s and 50s, are currently saving for retirement. It’s not because they are flippant about their future,...


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1. Myth: Millennials are anti-corporate hipsters who are unpersuadable by advertising

Back in the days of Occupy Wall Street, Millennials poured into the streets to demand that the government fight back against the excesses and corruption of Big Business. Millennials, it appeared, were reacting not only to the Great Recession of 2008, but also to the high value placed within American culture on material possessions. Debates around enacting a maximum wage (while raising the minimum wage) circled around the Occupiers, as they protested against the top 1% and multinational banks and corporations.

Of course, not all Millennials occupied Wall Street and those who did were not successful in fueling a revolution. Most did not reject their corporate overlords by mining Bitcoins and boycotting Nike. (As a quick aside, according to a recent study, Nike remains Millennials’ favorite brand.) Millennials poured into Starbucks on their way to Occupy rallies to pick up their sugar-free...


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When that second baby comes along, parents are now pros. They have plenty of experience to help make this time around with a newborn hopefully go a little smoother (or at least with less stress and maybe even more sleep). It’s also a bit less exciting for parents. As the youngest in my family, I used to flip through pages and pages of baby pictures of my older brother and sister, and wonder why there were so few of me lying around. Obviously, I was just as cute as them. But with three kids four and under, my parents didn’t really have an extra hand to hold a camera, let alone time to think about having us all pose for a picture. Time is always a premium with parents; so when that second kid comes, brands need to be as ready as parents are.

A recent global study by the market-research firm Trybe of more than 20,000 new or expectant parents found some surprising behavior when it came to purchasing new products for their second child. Parents often started back at square...


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Recent Posts
Aging Youth Guy Inspired to ‘Hack Longevity’
Five Millennial Myths: Confirmed!
Planning for Future
Millennial Myths: Debunked!
Second Time Around: Do Moms Shop Differently for the Second Baby?