“Battle of the Brands" (datafile only; no written report)

Compare your brand to your competition: Which resonates the deepest (and why) with Millennials and Gen Z? (datafile only, no written report)

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How does your brand compete with others in the battle to win today’s youth?

Brands that succeed with this key demo of Millennial and Gen Z consumers can enjoy their loyalty for years to come. This 13- to 24-year-old group is often given short shrift by brands that have a more adult target. That can prove to be short-sighted thinking. Teens and young adults not only spend significant amounts of their own money, they also influence the spending of parents, siblings, and other adults in their lives.

Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the relative strengths across a variety of measures of 57 youth-oriented brands. (See "Additional Deliverables" below for a full list of the 57 measured brands -- from Axe to YouTube!")
  • See how your brand is "personalized" -- learn where it statistically maps across 32 brand personality dimensions.
  • Discover how the 57 brands fare on the key measures of Awareness, Brand Interaction, Brand Connection, Brand Popularity, and Motivation.
  • Discover key insights into why some brand succeed, while others struggle, with these Millennials and Gen Z consumers.
  • These brands have been selected from a wide range of categories, including social causes, media and entertainment, retail, technology, and consumer packaged goods.

Why?

They are the adult shoppers of the future; building a relationship with them now can translate into loyalty that lasts their lifetime. This study shows you exactly where your brand fares among this critical cohort right now, and what you need to do increase young consumers' engagement with your brand. Become a co-sponsor of this actionable today! Increase your brand's youth standing tomorrow.

Methodology: Quantitative

Quantitative Design

Number of Interviews: 1200

Interview Length: 15 minutes

Statistical Analysis:

Correspondent analysis provides positioning maps for all 57 brands across 32 brand personality measures. These maps have been drawn in total, across categories and key demographic groups (age, gender, etc.). The dataset is designed to allow for other positioning techniques to be employed.

Design Rationale:

When designing this study, we aimed to fill a gap that has arisen as some longstanding youth syndicated studies of youth are no longer available. We focused on core measures of brand awareness, health, and personality. Many brands may already conduct custom studies focusing on their brands and likely a few key competitors; but, they are unlikely to be measured within a such a broad context of leading youth brands or among this particular age group. The resulting positioning maps can be eye opening to brand managers and strategists, fostering essential conversations and initiatives to improve and strengthen a brand’s position with young consumers.

How Sample will be Segmented:

This study utilized quota sampling in order to provide a nationally representative youth sample. Quotas were set by age, gender, region, and race/ethnicity; targets are proportional to US Census targets. The resulting dataset has been weighted to correct for minor imbalances in the quota sampling.

Sample Source:

The online sample was sourced from SSI, a leader in online samples for the market-research industry.

Quantitative Research Target

Gender: 50% Male, 50% Female

Ethnicity: Approximates national population distribution

Ages: 13 to 24

Geography: US Only; Approximates national population distribution

Deliverables

Reporting: Topline Report

Presentation: None

Additional Deliverables:

There are two distinct sets of deliverables for the study, which result in two different price points. This version includes an SPSS data file and the standard data tables.

In addition to the data file and tables, the more expensive option (listed separately on Collaborata) includes significant analysis and consultation. Specifically: a custom banner designed with your input; a 30-40 page PowerPoint deck that will feature a few slides customized to your brand and category, including personality brand mapping based on the 32 attributes; and a one-hour phone consultation/presentation with John Gerace, the research lead and president of Crux Research.

THE 57 MEASURED BRANDS:
Bath & Body Works 
Axe
Above the Influence
Boys & Girls Club
Gap (Red)
Glsen
It Gets Better Project
No Kid Hungry
Stand Up to Cancer
UNICEF
StayTeen.org
Do Something
Human Rights Campaign (HRC)
ESPN
NBA
Cosmopolitan Magazine
HTC
People
UFC
Adult Swim
Buzzfeed
Facebook
GoPro
Instagram
MTV
Nickelodeon
Samsung
Snapchat
Apple
Google
Netflix
YouTube
Toms
American Apparel
Skechers
H&M
Journeys
Under Armour
Vans
Nike
Ben & Jerrys
Skittles
Starbucks
Taco Bell
Coca-Cola
Doritos
Hershey's
Oreo
Subway
CDC: TIPSm Campaign
FDA: The Real Cost Campaign
Walmart
CVS
Walgreens
Amazon
Target
Uber
AirBnB

Timing: Available Immediately

Supplier

Company: Crux Research Inc.

Previous Projects: 2

Rating: Supplier has not been rated

Supplier's Qualifications:

Crux Research is a market-research firm dedicated to connecting decision makers with consumers, inspiring new thinking, and setting new standards for customer service. We focus on delivering insight with the power to drive change by building on a solid understanding of your business and culture.

Supplier's Team:

The project lead project for this study is John Geraci, President of Crux Research. A seasoned researcher with a broad base of experience, John has earned a reputation as a go-to researcher for understanding today’s youth generation and for market research in educational settings. A veteran of one of the nation’s largest research firms (Harris Interactive), John has overseen nearly two million interviews. His clients have included public school districts, colleges/ universities, consumer packaged goods companies, advertising agencies, media, manufacturers, dot-com businesses, technology firms, foundations, and associations. He has directed more than 2,000 market research projects.

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